Saturday, 30 March 2013

Beware people who want to charge to publish your work!

I won't name names, but I came across this website and as soon as I saw the below I went "Hello, this looks like a scam."

Vanity publishers crop up everyone, and they're eager to take a writer's money for the sake of vanity. Unless having something in print is on your bucket list, at all costs avoid vanity publishing. It's bad for your credibility. Besides the loss of money and credibility, with a vanity publisher you don't know who or what your story will sit next to. Imagine your hard work sitting in the middle of a bunch of crap writing. You might as well self publish.

Self publishing used to be considered a close cousin to vanity publishing, but the internet has starting giving self publishing an make over and its starting to become somewhat reputable. Self publishing is where the author pays for everything - editing, cover art, print set up, ISBN, etc. Self publishing gives a writer total control over their work and they reap all the benefits of the sales.

How do you know if you come across a vanity publisher? It's quite simple really. Publishers don't charge a processing fee. Vanity publishers do.

I particularly love the way you have to buy a copy of the book. Publishers will usually provide you with a number of copies for free. 
  

Below is a typical vanity publisher...AVOID AT ALL COSTS.

 

Here's How it Works!


Submission of your work to Write and Publish Fiction is FREE. Upon submission, your story will be judged by a panel of three judges and reviewed for several qualifying aspects. If your story passes this qualification process and is chosen to be published, a one-time non-refundable processing fee of just $49.97 will be required for me to proceed with publishing your story. That's all you will ever have to pay out (unless of course you want a copy of the book). The processing fee will help cover the costs of my time with editing, formatting and publishing the compiled book.
This is not a contest. Your work is being judged equally based on several qualifying criteria. Your work is NOT judged against other writer's stories. If your work is accepted by the judges, you will be notified by the end of July 2013 and your work will move onto the editing and formatting stage for final publication.

Thursday, 28 March 2013

Sci-fi novel FEEDBACK coming to print April 2013

EXCITING NEWS!!!

Feedback, the teen sci-fi novel reviewers are calling  "a wonderfully refreshing Young Adult Paranormal book..." is coming to print in April 2013.

Available at Book Depository, amazon, Barnes and Noble and many more onlibne retailers

"I would definitely recommend this book for anyone who likes a touch of paranormal to their realism or a touch of realism to their paranormal." The Book Maven

About the book:
Kidnapped for information they can't possibly know, and fuelled by the spirit of a dead CIA agent, Ethan, Florida, and Jake must look deep inside themselves if they are to finish the mission and save millions of lives. But they're being held captive in a strange place by a man who believes in Feedback, the theory that information is retained in the memory of organs - in this case those of a certain dead CIA agent donor. And their captor will stop at nothing to get the information retained in their newly transplanted organs.

genre:      young adult sci-fi/adventure
publisher: etopia press
ISBN 13:   9781937976774
also avail in digital format

Friday, 15 March 2013

Author highlights for this week

Author highlights for this week...

feedback

I'm pretty estatic about this highlight. Feedback, my young adult sci-fi adventure novel, has almost cracked the top 200 mark at Kobo Books.

Ebook available to buy for $5.76 at Kobo Books http://www.kobobooks.com/ebook/Feedback/book-A_a3PM6uTES3pE_tE-vm0w/page1.html?s=r8mH6TaYfU2Y1B1sG70S5g&r=2



literary agents

I discovered this database of literary agents that is totally kickass awesome. I am contacting agents this week about my recently completed young adult paranormal romance novel.

Anyone interested in checking out this "free!!!" yes "free!!!" database of agents please do so here. http://www.agentquery.com/search.aspx


new project

I'm taking a different path with my current project. It's an adult science fiction story of two men from two different worlds - one dystopian and one utopian - and what happens when they meet. This novel will probably take me the rest of 2013 to write but it's a story that's been in my head for a while.



Thursday, 14 March 2013

Giveaway - very unique sci-fi novel "Feedback" by D L Richardson

There's still plenty of time to enter the giveaway to win one of three ebook copies of my latest novel, Feedback.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Why should you enter? Feedback is one of the most original storylines I've ever dreamt up and had the pleasure to write. My love of this book comes from a fondness I have for early sci-fi flciks such as Logan's Run and Planet of the Apes. From the moment the idea popped into my head, I knew Feedback was going to be a unique storyline.

Is unique hard to sell? Sometimes. Because when an author writes the blurb for the book, they really don't want to give too much away. But to generate interest, they need to tell as much as possible so a reader will be intrigued enough to find out about the book. What does an author do? Give it all away or hope the story and writing is great enough to grab your attention from the first page.


Synopsis:
Ethan James, Florida Bowman, and Jake Inala are three teenagers who receive much-needed organ transplants. Two weeks later they are inadvertently recruited by the CIA when a spy dies halfway through his mission. Three bacteria bombs are set to detonate, spreading illness and death across the planet, and now it’s up to Ethan, Florida, and Jake to deactivate them.

Except that they have no idea where the bombs are located.

Kidnapped for information they can't possibly know, and fuelled by the spirit of a dead CIA agent, Ethan, Florida, and Jake must look deep inside themselves if they are to finish the mission and save millions of lives. But they're being held captive in a strange place by a man who believes in Feedback, the theory that information is retained in the memory of organs - in this case those of a certain dead CIA agent donor. And their captor will stop at nothing to get the information retained in their newly transplanted organs.


I guess if I had to pitch this book again I'd still have a hard time defining what it compares to. That's one of the troubles with unique. People want to know what ít's like.

However, don't take my word for it that Feedback is a unique story line. Here's a few snippets from reviewers.

Kaidans Seduction (December 2012)​
​"OH...MY...GOD...THIS BOOK IS EPIC. I have to say that I have never read a book like this before. I fell in love with this book right from the start. The premise of the book and the flow of the book hooks you right from the start. You never know what is going to happen so as you turn each page you are captured by what is happening..." ​Read more​​

Blooding Book Reviews (November 2012)
"...It’s actually a pretty complex story. It’s about these kids who all needed organs. Each kid had their own POV sections so that the reader could get their story. Richardson has a really great feel for when whiney becomes a problem. As I was reading the first character’s story, I was starting to get tired of the kid’s whiney-ness, and then the character said what I was thinking. His story really tugged at my heartstrings. I felt really bad for him, and when he got his Call, I was so super psyched..." Read more


Not into ebooks? That's okay Feedback will be released to print some time in 2013, though I don't as yet have a date. If you're in a hurry to grab the print copy, feel free to email the publisher of the novel, Etopia Press, at help@etopia-press.net.

Enjoy your week!
D L Richardson
xoxox


Wednesday, 13 March 2013

Minute taking is "NOT" creative writing

I volunteered to take the minutes to a board meeting at work the other week. I valiantly told myself that typing minutes at work is kinda like writing. Why did I tell myself this? The same reason I routinely tell myself that writing grocery lists and instructions to operate the washing machine are kinda like writing. Because I'm not J K Rowling yet. In an attempt to keep enthusiasm for writing on track, I make up this positive message crap about how I actually do get paid for my writing, provided that I count policies, employment contracts, recruitment ads and minutes as writing.

I'm kidding myself, of course. None of the above are ANYTHING akin to creative writing.

I also tell myself that query letters to agents and publishers is "creative writing". It takes the pressure off the guilt I feel when I spend an entire week typing email after email enticing these people to invest in me, when that time could have been spent doing...oh I don't know, let's say, writing novels.

There's "necessary" writing, and then there's "creative" writing. Writers often dream up worlds where we do more of the creative and less of the necessary. 

Here's a few images of my ultimate writing spaces:

 
 
 
This is the kind of decor I dream about. Drool. Love the Hollywood look.


Here's the real thing:


Writers can't help but be delusional. It's in our nature to create worlds and characters that aren't real. Plus the constant rejections sort of mess with our heads.

So what sort of necessary vs creative writing is on my plate right now?


Necessary

At home:
Query letters to agents and publishers
Blog posts
Media releases


At work:
Minutes to the board meeting
Email to applicants advising them we are still considering their application
Position description
Letter to notify increase in pay


Creative

At home:
Current project - set in a dystopian and utopian world
Previous project - still working on fixing a few things
Short story about a man who charges into a heavily armed area and discovers a secret
Short story about an android who gets left behind


At work:
Ummmmm, nothing I work in HR. We're all about legislation and regulation and policy.

I wonder what sort of necessary writing Stephen King gets up to.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

D L Richardson is the author of speculative fiction. She has three teen novels and one short story anthology published. Her first novel reached number 2 at OmniLit and number 38 at Kobo Books. Her second reached number 1 at OmniLit. Little Red Gem is her third novel and recently won 2nd place Best Books of 2013 Paranormal Cravings. She lives in Australia on the NSW south coast with her husband and dog.


Contact information

Email                   dlrichardsonbooks@bigpond.com 
Blog           www.dlrichardsonwrites.blogspot.com
Website          www.dlrichardson.com Facebook      http://goo.gl/560JXl  
Twitter              www.twitter.com/#!/DLRichardson1

Tuesday, 5 March 2013

Coffee chat with author Angela Parson Myers


Welcome, Angela Parson Myers, to my virtual coffee lounge

 
D L: I'm having a weak long black with one sugar. There are no magazines in this coffee lounge, just hundreds of books. Some books even have names in the front page or previous owners. In this coffee lounge it's perfectly fine to tuck your feet under your legs with or without shoes. And there's always something cooking in the oven.

So, Angela, coffee…how do you have it and what’s your favorite time of the day to partake?

 
ANGELA: Instead of having a mailbox at our house (long story), Hubby and I have a post office box, and on the way to pick up our mail is a very nice Panera, where I can buy my favorite coffee in the whole world. We stop in for breakfast about three times a week, and I have a couple cups of cream-laden, sugared coffee (just how my father taught me to drink it) with a cinnamon crunch bagel and hazelnut cream cheese. Then I sometimes like to walk from home to the nearby mall in the afternoon, where I stop at a locally owned coffee shop for a caramel latte. On Sunday, I stop at the church lounge for coffee on my way down to the television studio to help with the broadcast. After dinner, we make Starbucks decaf at home and top it off with a tablespoon or so of whipped cream for dessert. Oddly, I never considered myself much of coffee drinker until I read what I just wrote. : - )


D L: Congrats on the release of When The Moon Is Gibbous And Waxing. What an unusual title. In a world of one word titles (Fallen, Halo, Shiver, Beasty, Matched, Divergent, Shattered etc) what made you choose a traditional title?

 
ANGELA: I HATE short titles! Too many books with the same one, and none of them really tell you much about the story. My title is a term that I first heard in astronomy class at the University of Illinois, and I was struck by the poetic rhythm. (I've been writing poetry for many years, and some has even been published in magazines I actually respected.) Then it just slipped into the manuscript very naturally, and when it did, I had an Aha! moment. Later I considered shortening it to Gibbous Moon, but when I Googled that, bajillions of books popped up, so I went back to the longer version.

 
D L: I see you’ve got quite a lot of great 5 star reviews.

 
You’ve told me you’re 20,000 words into the sequel. Did you always plan a sequel, or is your sequel a response to the audience wanting to know more about these characters?

 
ANGELA: Nearly everyone who's read it has asked what happens next, but the sequel came about because about the time I finished the massive first edit (cutting about 40,000 words) I flashed on a scene from maybe 25 years in the future and knew I had to write it, but that several other things had to happen first. Those other things are just gradually filling in. I see another book after the sequel I'm working on now, then the book that contains the scene I flashed on.

 
D L: Do you think your background in professional writing prepared you for creative writing, and if yes, what components of professional writing crossed over into creative?

 
ANGELA: My background as a writer absolutely helped prepare me for creative writing. My training as an editor gave me a solid background in grammar, and years of practice helped me develop organizational skills that are applicable to both types of writing. And just as important, I know from experience that I'm not going to sit down and regurgitate a story and walk away from it. Sometimes I just have to keep plugging until the story is finished; sometimes I have to start somewhere in the middle and write to both ends; sometimes the story changes as I write it--I've learned to call that inspiration. And above all, my background taught me the value of proofreading. I don't even send out an e-mail without checking it at least three times. And it still will never be perfect. At a certain point, you just have to set a deadline and stop when you reach it.

 
D L: If life is a highway, what mode of transport are you taking?

 
ANGELA: After much thought--probably a Jeep Wrangler. It's open so I can observe the scenery, and instead of being built for speed, it's built to handle all the detours of the scenic route. And heaven knows, I've NEVER gotten anywhere in my life's journey by taking the interstate. My educational career was disjointed and convoluted, but I finally got my bachelor's degree at the age of 46. On the way to my dream job as a writer/editor/photographer, I was a television writer, sales clerk, newspaper staff writer, waitress, logistics tech, and metallurgical tech--not to mention wife and mother. I learned how to run a television camera, burden tooling complexes, drive fork trucks, weld, spin news releases, and plan complex events and crisis communication--sometimes at the same time.... And that's just part of it. Yeah, a Jeep Wrangler might do it--or a track-type tractor.

 
D L: Lastly, what is your favorite werewolf story and why?

 
ANGELA: The only werewolf story I've ever read/seen that I absolutely love is Ladyhawke, and I love it not because of the shapeshifting--I'm not even sure the hero qualifies as a werewolf--but because of the love story. I did like the werewolf character in Sanctuary, too, though that doesn't qualify as a werewolf story either--just a story that has a werewolf in it. I've always had a soft spot for werewolves, but I've had a hard time finding stories I could relate to. I think I tried to remedy that by writing one for myself.

Also, I really like Monroe on Grimm, too. He's a werewolf of sorts, isn't he?

I hope you enjoyed learning a bit about Angela, I certainly did. And I for one want to hear about the mail box story. What about you? Leave a comment and I'm sure Angela might be coaxed into divulging the mysterious tale behind the mailbox.

 
BOOK COVER:



SYNOPSIS:

Unspeakable evil rises with the moon...

Graduate student Natalie Beres can't remember who attacked her that autumn night under the full moon. She can't remember anything between leaving her lab in a secluded building at the south end of campus and arriving at her apartment in the wee hours of the morning. Covered in blood. Not her own. Other than the loss of memory, she's completely unharmed.

She can't say the same for the men who attacked her. The grisly campus murders force Natalie to dig deeper into what happened that night, to force herself to remember. But what she learns about herself is horrifying. When the police officer investigating the murders tries to get close, Natalie is caught between her attraction to him and her fear of discovery. But worse, can she avoid being found by the young man with a similar problem who's on his way from the West coast to find her...leaving a trail of shredded corpses along the way...?

 

SHOP ONLINE:

Amazon | All Romance | Barnes & Noble





ABOUT THE AUTHOR

D L Richardson is the author of speculative fiction. She has three teen novels and one short story anthology published. Her first novel reached number 2 at OmniLit and number 38 at Kobo Books. Her second reached number 1 at OmniLit. Little Red Gem is her third novel and recently won 2nd place Best Books of 2013 Paranormal Cravings. She lives in Australia on the NSW south coast with her husband and dog.


Contact information

Email                   dlrichardsonbooks@bigpond.com 
Blog           www.dlrichardsonwrites.blogspot.com
Website          www.dlrichardson.com Facebook      http://goo.gl/560JXl  
Twitter              www.twitter.com/#!/DLRichardson1

 

Saturday, 2 March 2013

D L Richardson school visit media coverage


The Irrigator
1 March 2013


Author's powerful message   

THE Leeton High School year 12 advanced English class got creative with a published author last Friday.

The class was led by D L (Debbie) Richardson, who is the author of young adult fiction novels The Bird With The Broken Wing and Feedback.

She had been invited to prepare a creative writing session specifically targeted toward the Year 12 curriculum by teacher Martin Maley to put together a workshop.

Mr Maley told Mrs Richardson there were 10 students taking the English creative writing extension class and that they had to write a 6000-word short story, but many had difficulties coming up with ideas.

"This isn't a condition exclusive to teenagers," Mrs Richardson said.

"Many writers face writer's block, although over the years I've developed techniques to overcome this challenge.

"I was delighted to deliver a workshop that suited the extension students' needs and also included a component of the curriculum for the remaining senior students."

There were three components to the creative writing session � coming up with ideas; from idea to a first draft; and first draft to final.

"Not only did the students learn about creative writing, I learned something about the writing process as well while preparing my notes," Mrs Richardson said.
"I learned that, although I've written short stories and novels for 15 years, I need to stop and have a look at writing from an outsider's perspective, because storytelling is at its most powerful when told using alternate points of view.

"This opportunity enabled me to see the foundations of the creative writing process, which has become second nature to me. And we all know that when we take things for granted we often become complacent."
Mrs Richardson hoped to return to Leeton and continue improving the creative writing of students.


Author Guest post on Smart Girls Love Sci-Fi blog

“The Evolution Of Sci-Fi” – The Movie


By young adult fiction author D L Richardson

Space 1999 is a British science-fiction television series that ran for two seasons and originally aired from 1975 to 1977. That’s the Wikipedia description.

The truth is that Space 1999 was the coolest TV show on Earth because it featured a character named Maya (Catherine Schell) who could shape shift into anything – bug, monkey, monster, mouse. In one episode she shifted into a black panther, which was the most magnificent thing my seven year old brain had ever seen. Continue reading



 

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE
 
or copy and paste the below URL into your web browser


Thanks Charlee at Smart Girls Love Sci Fi for having me on your site today. It was a blast for me to take a trip down memory lane. So many great sci-fi memories.

D L Richardson
xoxo