Tuesday, 25 February 2014

Top 10 Australian independent magazines for teenage girls

First up, I have to say that there aren't 10 blog/magazines listed, only 9. I couldn't find 10 so if you know of any please please please let me know who they are so I can include them on this list.

Flicking through the internet for stories is a bit like flicking through a pile of magazine clippings on the floor. It can be fun putting everything you want to read together in one pile, but after a while you might want to sit in a chair and have that pile put together in more manageable fashion for you to read, say maybe like the magazines or blogs the articles were cut out of.

Okay, that's enough of that analogy. This article is about finished product of blogs and magazines that compile together a host of articles on subjects a reader is interested in. I'm featured ten nine Australian independent magazines both virtual and tangible which I came across during one of my wild searches through hundreds of internet sites.

Magazines have really taken a bashing over the past decade. And once more the internet is copping the blame. Perhaps this decline is just another example of gatekeepers telling the audience what they want to read. I don't know the answers, but I do know that print publishing is going through a major change and this includes magazines. I don't know about you, but I get disillusioned flicking through some magazines and all I see is trash - though I understand that they call them trashy mags for a reason. Still, the evolution to change back to something positive and not destructive is approaching and I am so happy about that.

I selected these magazines for one reason - they focused on girl power over girl image. It's important for me as a woman and as a writer that I send a positive message about us. I hope these magazines do great things because I for one am sick to death of seeing people who are famous for nothing of any substance being branded as our idols.

1. Yen Magazine

Their slogan is "For smart creative cookies who like to be inspired". Still features an image of a girl on the front of every cover, but many of them are singers, musicians, and actors and the message is one of power and inspiration, rather than how to make a 14 year old look like a slut. Loads on interesting articles and interviews and a great focus of music.

2. Bella Magazine

A book of "beauty, value and purpose". It's the latest magazine for girls aged 13 - 19 and was launched in 2009 to provide girls with an alternative to the sexed-up modern magazines. The covers features happy teenage girls. It's a true indie magazine in that it needs to raise it's own money to continue running and you can buy Bella products on their affiliated online store.

3. Young Vagabond

"More than a magazine". The first edition of Young Vagabond was published after the co-founders Ashleigh Grogon and Haylee Collins raised $17,960 dollars to launch and print. Up to edition 3 and no doubt working on edition 4. Lots of great quality articles that the glossy magazines don't have time to produce because they're too busy making stuff up to go with a random photo.

4. Frankie

Frankie is up to issue 58, Frankie is powering along as a well established and successful independent magazine. They've managed to get themselves on many shelves and their blog is exciting to look through. the magazine and blog have a lovely home-craft feel about it, which is so different from every other magazine and no doubt that along with great articles, this creative feel helps their success.

5. The Brainwash Project

It's easy to forget that independent magazines need to raise their own funds in order to be produced. And print costs bucket loads. The founder Jessica Barlow raised enough to produce the first magazine, but since then has just kept the online and Facebook sites up and running and contributes to other magazines. maybe we'll see future editions. I hope so. We need more of the Brainwash magazines and less of the Braindead ones.


6. S-Press

S-Press is the only free full-colour magazine just for Australia's teenagers. Whether it be music, sport, celebrity goss, current affairs, careers advice or simply the awesome things teens are doing right now, this mag has got it covered.

Wish they had magazines like this when I was going to school.

7. Onya Magazine

Founded by Sandi Sieger in June 2009. Onya Magazine's true purpose is to present to all Australians, and the rest of the world, a firm image of what Australia is all about: style, fun, intelligence, humour, community and spirit. It covers everything from arts and culture, to parenting and lifestyle, serious topics and fun topics too, and of course the old classics - fashion and beauty.

8. Mamamia

Mamamia (one word, unlike the ABBA song) unashamedly cover what everyone is talking about today: whether that’s stories which will make you laugh out loud, cover your mouth in shock, help you get informed or start you thinking about an issue in a different way and sometimes, we help you to just switch off the brain power from a few sweet minutes and kick back.

This magazine styled blog was started by Mia Freedman. I've seen her speak at a convention for women and she was very inspiring. She's been a role model of mine since then. She's one person I'd love to meet one day.

9. Indigo4Girls

Indigo is a positive, body friendly, age appropriate magazine for girls. Not only is it full of fun stuff, but it actually makes girls feel great about who they are. They flick through the pages and see themselves. How cool is that! Currently available via direct mail order or online. Which goes to prove my theory that readers still want something tangible to read, but how they buy it and get it delivered is the big change, though many magazines are delivered through mail order so maybe not so much a change. Mmm, have to think about that.


Anyway, I hope you take a moment to flick through these blogs and magazines and I hope you get inspired to do great things.


Take care!
D L




ABOUT THE AUTHOR

D L Richardson is the author of speculative fiction. She has three teen novels and one short story anthology published. Her first novel reached number 2 at OmniLit and number 38 at Kobo Books. Her second reached number 1 at OmniLit. Little Red Gem is her third novel and recently won 2nd place Best Books of 2013 Paranormal Cravings. She lives in Australia on the NSW south coast with her husband and dog.


Contact information

Email                   dlrichardsonbooks@bigpond.com 
Blog           www.dlrichardsonwrites.blogspot.com
Website          www.dlrichardson.com
Facebook      http://goo.gl/560JXl  
Twitter              www.twitter.com/#!/DLRichardson1

Saturday, 22 February 2014

Win 1 of 5 signed copies of YA sci-fi novel (comp runs Sun 23 Feb to Sun 3 Mar 14 - Australian residents only)


WIN 1 OF 5 SIGNED COPIES OF YOUNG ADULT SCI-FI NOVEL "FEEDBACK"
 
Before you get too excited...this competition is open to Australian residents only.
SOUTH COAST NSW author D L Richardson blends science with fiction in this novel about three teenagers who are abducted by a man who believes in Feedback, the theory that information is retained in the memory of organs. These teens don’t know that their organ donor was CIA agent Dylan Black, but their captor does, and he will stop at nothing to get the information Dylan died trying to hide. Ethan James, Florida Bowman, and Jake Inala quickly discover that feedback is real, and fuelled by the spirit of the CIA agent they must learn to trust unfamiliar instincts, trust each other, and trust themselves if they are to finish the mission and save millions of lives.

TO ENTER:
q    Go to at www.dlrichardson.com  (Competitions page)
OR
and tell us in 50 words or less, what your experience with organ donation has been.
Donate Life week is about encouraging Australians to have the chat that saves life. Have you talked to family members about donating your organs and tissue?  Or maybe you have a personal experience with donating or receiving organs and tissue.  Simply tell us your experience and you could win a signed copy of this science fiction novel other readers are calling “a phenomena read” and “EPIC”.
Open to Australian residents only. Full T&Cs at www.dlrichardson.com  (Competitions page)
Competition begins Sunday 23 February 2014 and ends Sunday 2 March 2014.
 
Good luck!
 
 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

D L Richardson is the author of speculative fiction. She has three teen novels and one short story anthology published. Her first novel reached number 2 at OmniLit and number 38 at Kobo Books. Her second reached number 1 at OmniLit. Little Red Gem is her third novel and recently won 2nd place Best Books of 2013 Paranormal Cravings. She lives in Australia on the NSW south coast with her husband and dog.


Contact information

Email                   dlrichardsonbooks@bigpond.com 
Blog           www.dlrichardsonwrites.blogspot.com
Website          www.dlrichardson.com
Facebook      http://goo.gl/560JXl  
Twitter              www.twitter.com/#!/DLRichardson1

Friday, 21 February 2014

Celebrating the small wins


Little Red Gem takes 2nd place in Battle of the Books 2013 at Paranormal Cravings. I meant to tell everyone this last year, but things got so hectic that I completely forgot. Then there was Christmas and New Year. Then it was the start of writing my next novel. Time got away but I do recall that I celebrated this little win.

I think it's important to take time out to celebrate the small successes. It's also a way of forcing myself to take a well-deserved break. I am often up early in the morning doing something at the computer - writing, editing, pitching, promoting - and I'm there until I go to bed. I get so addicted to it that these little celebrations are great for recharging my batteries.

2013 ended up being an okay year for me as far as the little wins went. Two of my novels made it to the bestsellers list at OmniLit, there were some high rankings on Kobo, and of course of my novels reached 2nd place in a reader voted battle of the books.

So how do I celebrate the little wins?

  • Usually I go out to dinner with my husband or my friends.
  • Sometimes I buy a bottle of champagne and watch TV all night long.
  • Chocolate.
  • Baking.
  • Sometimes I go shopping.
  • I make a collage and stick it on the back of my door as a reminder of what I have achieved so far.
  • I tell myself well done.
Sometimes I think the last point is overlooked, but we need to tell ourselves "well done". Writing is a solitary business. There is often nobody around to pat us on the back or to encourage us to keep going. Sometimes it's the opposite. People see how much we do for so little financial return that they try might think it's best if we chuck it all in.

Honestly, I love what I do that I wouldn't stop it for anything. Okay, maybe I'll stop it for a little bit while I celebrate a small success.

How do you celebrate your little wins?



ABOUT THE AUTHOR

D L Richardson is the author of speculative fiction. She has three teen novels and one short story anthology published. Her first novel reached number 2 at OmniLit and number 38 at Kobo Books. Her second reached number 1 at OmniLit. Little Red Gem is her third novel and recently won 2nd place Best Books of 2013 Paranormal Cravings. She lives in Australia on the NSW south coast with her husband and dog.


Contact information

Email                   dlrichardsonbooks@bigpond.com 
Blog           www.dlrichardsonwrites.blogspot.com
Website          www.dlrichardson.com
Facebook      http://goo.gl/560JXl  
Twitter              www.twitter.com/#!/DLRichardson1
 

Thursday, 6 February 2014

One writer's editing journey

I love reading blog posts about an author's editing journeys. I read them to discover tips or receive affirmation that I'm on the right track. I've just finished reading one by Dee Scribe Writing http://deescribewriting.wordpress.com/2014/02/04/tuesday-writing-tips-revising-some-technical-tips/ and I'm happy to say that this is how I conduct my editing process.

Liar. I'm right now editing my current novel and... well, actually, I'm not RIGHT NOW editing because I'm writing this post. (A minute's silence). I'm back. Just went off to switch on the kettle. So technically I'm still not RIGHT NOW editing my current novel. Hang on a sec....dog's staring at me like she wants me to walk her.

I can't help but love the distractions that editing presents because I have come to accept that editing is loathsome work. It's not fun, it's methodical. It uses the right side of the brain instead of the creative side. It's process driven and therefore boring. Why can't I just have this wonderful idea in my head magically morph into a 100,000 words novel and I come in at the end to do the final read, which is my favourite bit.

To help me while editing, this is what I write at the beginning of my manuscript to keep me on track: 

Editing rounds

1.      Dialogue – 1st person, present tense, internal narrative, dialogue

2.      Backstory – put dot points and quotes at the start of each chapter – don’t take allex out of character while he’s inside.

3.      More action – killings, shootings, sieges, fires in the hives, bombings, planes

4.      Descriptions – build the world, add in the future, hair, houses, cars, giant screens

5.      Dialogue action

6.      Weapons – give them unique names i.e metal walkers for the MGU mobile gun units

7.      Taboo words

8.      Chapter beginnings and endings

9.      The final read
 
This is what actually happens:


Editing rounds

1.      Make lots of cups of coffee and tell myself that getting up and down all day is exercise

2.      Search on line for things and tell myself that I need things to ward off insanity

3.      Consider hiring a ghost writer and tell myself that I will be presenting a solution to the world’s unemployment problem

4.      Read emails and post stuff on Facebook, and tell myself that I should be writing so that when I strike it rich I can afford to hire an admin person who can read emails and post stuff on Facebook

5.      Set myself a daily word limit and then feel bad when I don’t meet it because of too many distractions

6.      Buys more books and tell myself that reading will help with writing only once I pick up a book that’s it, I’m done for

7.      Start at the end of the manuscript and tell myself that working my way backwards might stimulate the right side of my brain

8.      Write a hundred blurbs because they stimulate the right side of the brain

9.      Get grumpy and tell myself that if I’m grumpy enough people might leave me alone so I can do editing


As I said earlier, my favourite part of editing is the final read. This is where all the hard work has been done and I'm only looking to tweak a few things that stand out as odd. This is where I am one step closer to the reader. It's their reaction I'm waiting with bated breath for. Until this final stage, the manuscript and the reader never get to meet.

I'm at step 1 - dialogue - and the second after I down my second cup of coffee for the morning, I am going to lock myself in a tower with no internet access or books or coffee pots or phones and get cracking with the editing.

Wish me luck!



ABOUT THE AUTHOR

D L Richardson is the author of speculative fiction. She has three teen novels and one short story anthology published. Her first novel reached number 2 at OmniLit and number 38 at Kobo Books. Her second reached number 1 at OmniLit. Little Red Gem is her third novel and recently won 2nd place Best Books of 2013 Paranormal Cravings. She lives in Australia on the NSW south coast with her husband and dog.


Contact information

Email                   dlrichardsonbooks@bigpond.com 
Blog           www.dlrichardsonwrites.blogspot.com
Website          www.dlrichardson.com
Facebook      http://goo.gl/560JXl  
Twitter              www.twitter.com/#!/DLRichardson1