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Coffee chat with AnneMarie Brear, Aussie author of historical fiction


Welcome to AnneMarie Brear, author of historical and contemporary romance novels, plus the odd short story.
 
AnneMarie has wonderful news to share on the coffee chat today. She is one of a number of authors chosen to be published by Norwegian publisher, Cappelen Damm. Her book, "Where Dragonflies Hover", will be translated and published in Norway!
 
This is many author's dream to have books translated into foreign languages, so please join me in congratulating AnneMarie on this achievement.

DL: Firstly, since this a virtual coffee chat, how do you have your coffee? Are you a morning or afternoon person?

AnneMarie: Definitely a morning person. I find I get more things done in the morning. I have a coffee machine at home, so I enjoy a nice cappuccino with no sugar.  

DL: You have an impressive list of novels. 14 now, I believe. Does the writing get faster and easier with each new book, or do you still face the same challenges?



AnneMarie: Because I mainly write historical fiction, I still have to do a lot of research for each novel, which can slow the process down. No matter how much you think you know a period or era well, you still have to double check everything. So my novels now take about a year to write, unlike my first novel which took me 2 years to write because I had no idea what I was doing at the time. Now, when I write a novel I know the art and craft of writing one, so it’s only the research that will take the time.

DL: If you could go back in time to the Victorian ages, would you stay for a short visit or would you consider living there? And why?

AnneMarie: That’s a good question. I think I would only stay a short time, unless I was very wealthy. If I was rich back then and able to afford servants and a beautiful country house, perhaps I would consider staying. Servants to do all the hard work of everyday living such as cooking and cleaning would make life so much easier.

DL: I'm sure you're a fan of TV shows like Escape To The Country. Do you rely on TV shows, books, etc for your research, or have you visited England and Scotland for yourself?

AnneMarie: I actually live in England now. I’ve been living here for nearly 5 years, after marrying a wonderful Englishman. So I have the luxury of being surrounded by history. I really enjoy visiting country houses and exploring old buildings and castles in ancient towns. To see these places in person really does help my research.

DL: And last question, what is your favourite biscuit and/or cake at the moment?

Anne Marie: I love cakes, much more than biscuits. I will try any cake at least once! My favourites are chocolate fudge cake, carrot cake, coffee and walnut cake. Actually I think I will eat just about any cake.

DL: Thanks so much for stopping by and congratulations on the Norwegian translation!

AnneMarie: Thank you for having me. 

About the book
You can check out her current book "Where Dragonflies Hover" which is described as being "choc-lit".

https://www.amazon.com/Where-Dragonflies-Hover-strangers-intriguing-ebook/dp/B01D0KA7JA/ref=la_B00705A120_1_19?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1458221667&sr=1-19&refinements=p_82%3AB00705A120

Sometimes a glimpse into the past can help make sense of the future …Everyone thinks Lexi is crazy when she falls in love with Hollingsworth House – a crumbling old Georgian mansion in Yorkshire – and nobody more so than her husband, Dylan. But there’s something very special about the place, and Lexi can sense it. 

Whilst exploring the grounds she stumbles across an old diary and, within its pages, she meets Allie – an Australian nurse working in France during the First World War.

Lexi finally realises her dream of buying Hollingsworth but her obsession with the house leaves her marriage in tatters. In the lonely nights that follow, Allie’s diary becomes Lexi’s companion, comforting her in moments of darkness and pain. And as Lexi reads, the nurse’s scandalous connection to the house is revealed …


About being translated into Norwegian

"The translation rights have been bought for Where Dragonflies Hover by Norwegian publisher Cappelen Damm AS. https://www.cappelendamm.no/ This is an excellent opportunity for one of my books to reach an ever wider audience by being translated into another language. I am so thrilled with this new development and am looking forward to seeing this new partnership grow. More information about the trade deal can be found here.http://www.booktrade.info/index.php/showarticle/66293"

Sounds like a great opportunity AnneMarie, we wish you the best.
 
About AnneMarie
 
Annemarie Brear has been a life-long reader and started writing in 1997 when her children were small. She has a love of history, of grand old English houses and a fascination of what might have happened beyond their walls. Her interests include reading, genealogy, watching movies, spending time with family and eating chocolate - not always in that order!
 
 

You can follow AnneMarie
Annemarie Brear on the web:  http://annemariebrear.blogspot.co.uk
https://www.facebook.com/annemariebrear 
Twitter @annemariebrear


THANKS EVERYONE FOR STOPPING BY. DONT' FORGET TO SAY HI TO ANNEMARIE IN THE COMMENTS SECTION

 
D.L.

Comments

  1. Thank you for hosting me, Debbie!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My pleasure, Stay in touch and keep us up to date with how the translation goes. We're all keen to hear about it.

      Debbie

      Delete
  2. I miss sharing lush cakes with you at the cafe in Bowral! Wonderful news and much deserved! Where Dragonflies Hover is a great read!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the recommendation Maggi. What sort of lush cakes? Do tell. I'm drooling.
      Debbie

      Delete
  3. Hi Maggi. Didn't we have the best lunches! We put the world to rights over coffee. I miss that. 😊

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You'll now have to put the world to rights over tea, AnneMarie. Very civilised.

      Delete

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